Since the beginning of COVID-19, airport employers have made certain decisions which affect our members. For example, as a result of lay-offs at airports, employees involved have found their professional and personal futures unpredictable. This put some of our members, as well as many other workers in this environment, in an unstable situation, forcing them to rethink their future and ability to achieve a sufficient income for themselves and their families. It’s only this year, more than two years since the start of the pandemic, that airports have done large scale hiring. Here are some statistics on positions which have opened up at airports, compared to the number of members who worked there before the pandemic.

  • Edmonton

Members at the airport as of March 2019: 229

Number of members at the airport as of February 2021: 162

Number of members currently at the airport: 150

Job postings on website: 12

Gap between 2019 and 2022: -79 employees

WEBSITE

 

  • Ottawa

Members at the airport as of March 2019: 181

Number of members at the airport as of February 2021: 152

Number of members currently at the airport: 117

Job openings posted on website: 20+ positions available

Gap between 2019 and 2022: -64 employees

JOB FAIR

WEBSITE

 

  • Calgary

Members at the airport as of March 2019: 221

Number of members at the airport as of February 2021: 150

Number of members currently at the airport: 179

Jobs posted on the website: 11

Gap between 2019 and 2022: -42 employees

WEBSITE

 

  • Winnipeg

Members at the airport as of March 2019: 136

Number of members at the airport as of February 2021: 113

Number of members currently at the airport: 100

Job postings on website: 5

Gap between 2019 and 2022: -36 employees

WEBSITE

 

  • Halifax

Members at the airport as of March 2019: 172

Number of members at the airport as of February 2021: 153

Number of members currently at the airport: 136

Jobs posted on the website: 2

Gap between 2019 and 2022: -36 employees

WEBSITE

 

With the return to normal airport traffic, UCTE expected its members to get their jobs back. However, these statistics show the reduced number of employees at each of the above-mentioned airports. We can easily conclude that the overreaction of airport authorities is now putting the Canadian population in an uncomfortable situation. Their leaders are unable to readjust to the pre-pandemic situation. The lack of staff and experts at airports is leading to havoc, as has been witnessed in recent months: flight delays, lost luggage, among other difficulties. We hope that airports will take charge of this emergency situation for the benefit of the Canadian population and travelers.